U.S. EPA proposes toxic emission cuts

March 2, 2006

The U.S. Environmental Protection agency says it is proposing reducing emissions from gasoline, vehicles and gasoline containers.

EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson says by 2030 the proposed Mobile Source Air Toxic regulations, together with fuel and vehicle standards already in effect, would reduce toxic emissions from passenger vehicles to 80 percent below 1999 levels.

"America has a history of loving its cars," said Johnson in a statement. "By cleaning up our fuels and vehicle exhaust, EPA is paving the road toward a cleaner environment and healthier drivers."

The MSAT proposal would set new benzene standards for gasoline, hydrocarbon emissions standards for passenger vehicles at cold temperatures, and evaporative standards for fuel containers.

If the new standards are fully implemented in 2030, they would reduce emissions of mobile source air toxins annually by 350,000 tons, including 65,000 tons of benzene.

The proposed MSAT standards would take effect in 2011 for fuel requirements, 2010 for passenger vehicles, and 2009 for fuel containers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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