Study: City bees better than rural bees

January 17, 2006

A French beekeepers' association says it has determined bees reared in cities are healthier and more productive than bees raised in rural areas.

The association, Unaf, says urban bees enjoy higher temperatures and a wider variety of plant life for pollination, while avoiding ill-effects of pesticides, the BBC reported. They can also better filter city pollution, such as exhaust fumes.

Beekeepers say urban bees' productivity can be as much as four times that of their rural counterparts.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Urban hives can help safeguard the future of food, says a scientist and beekeeper

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