Briefs: Cell phones used for more than just talk

January 18, 2006

An increasing number of mobile users are using their cell phones for more than talking, a survey by Sprint found Wednesday.

The mobile provider's consumer wireless usage study found that 56 percent of subscribers use their phones as cameras, clocks, calendars, music players and other non-talk functions.

"The list of features and data applications available on mobile phones continues to grow to meet the needs of consumers on the go," said Jeff Hallock, vice president of product marketing and strategy.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Mobile app automatically sends a caller's location and medical data to dispatch centers

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