Web co offering 'Xtreme Web Makeover' (Update)

December 19, 2005

A Chicago-based Web design company said Monday they are searching for the "worst Web site." Intechnic Corporation, a Web development company, announced as a publicity campaign they will award who they deem the "worst" business Web site a $10,000 makeover.

In a release the company said, "Have you ever had a frustrating online experience where you couldn't find what you were looking for, couldn't place an order, or even find the order button? Intechnic Corporation is searching for the worst business Web site to award a free 'Xtreme Web site Makeover,' a complete professional Web site redesign."

Intechnic's CEO, Andrew Kucheriavy, explained the company is sponsoring the search in an effort to raise awareness of the importance of having a well-designed customer-oriented Web site. Companies will have to nominate themselves and then undergo open Web voting as to who really is the "worst" -- a mixed honor.

"Most companies are committed to customer satisfaction, however, some of them aren't even aware that problems exist on their Web sites due to lack of contact with their customers," said Kucheriavy. "We're giving companies the chance to see the experience from their customers' perspective, and also giving people a way to provide constructive feedback about their online experiences. Now, Internet users can vote to determine which Web sites really need to be improved, and this is valuable information for companies to have."

This in Intechnic's first year running the contest, and Kucheriavy said they have no estimate as of yet regarding the number of persons who will vote online to bestow the mantle of worst site.

Kucheriavy said that in judging Web sites the important factors to look at include design, ease of use and mission (what the site is supposed to be designed for).

The Intechnic CEO said that during the nearly 10 years of the Web developers existence, "we have helped thousands of companies reach their potential," in design and other technical consulting.

The company was founded in 1997 by two computer-science students "to address the Web development needs of small to medium-sized businesses" and has grown to around 30 staff. In 2003 Intechnic acquired Binfiks Ltd., Web development firms in Central Europe, with offices located in Riga, Latvia.

Kucheriavy declined to release information on company sales, citing the fact that it was proprietary, but noted such large clients as home builder M. A. Mortenson Company, work done for the U.S. Navy, and Brunswick Billiards Inc.

The contest is available online at www.xtreme-website-makeover.com until Jan. 15, 2006. According to contest rules anyone can nominate their Web site by submitting a short story explaining why they think their Web site is the worst.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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