New Nanoparticle Structure Boosts Magnetic Properties

Dec 19, 2005

Magnetic nanoparticles have shown promise as contrast-enhancing agents for improving cancer detection using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as miniaturized heaters capable of killing malignant cells, and as targeted drug delivery vehicles. Now, researchers at the University of Idaho have developed a new type of nanoparticle that produces a magnetic field up to 10 times stronger than typical iron oxide nanoparticles. Clearer MRI images of small tumors and more accurate tumor targeting could be the result.

A research team led by You Qiang, Ph.D., reports in the Journal of Nanoparticle Research that it has developed a method for creating iron nanostructured clusters that can then be coated with a thin layer of iron oxide. The investigators also discuss how their method can create these so-called “core-shell” nanoparticles of exact size ranging from 2 nanometers to 100 nanometers in diameter.

Characterization of these core-shell nanostructures show that their magnetic moment, a measure of their strength as a magnet, depends on the size of the final particle – particles with a diameter of 3 nanometers have a magnetic moment of 80 emu (the unit of magnetic moment) per gram, while those with a diameter of 100 nanometer have a magnetic moment of 205 emu per gram, close to the maximum value for pure iron. In contrast, typical iron oxide nanoparticles have a magnetic moment of 20 to 30 emu per gram.

This work is detailed in a paper titled, “Iron/iron oxide core-shell nanoclusters for biomedical applications.” This paper was published online in advance of print publication.

Soruce: National Cancer Institute

Explore further: Project uses crowd computing to improve water filtration

Related Stories

Nanoparticles to kill cancer cells with heat

Jun 17, 2015

Heat may be the key to killing certain types of cancer, and new research from a team including National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) scientists has yielded unexpected results that should help ...

A new and game-changing magnetoresistance

Jun 16, 2015

More than 150 years ago, William Thomson, later Lord Kelvin, discovered the magnetoresistive effect. Today, this finding enables sensors to measure the rotational speed of a car wheel, and is also used in ...

Recommended for you

Project uses crowd computing to improve water filtration

6 hours ago

Nearly 800 million people worldwide don't have access to safe drinking water, and some 2.5 billion people live in precariously unsanitary conditions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...

Engineering the world's smallest nanocrystal

10 hours ago

In the natural world, proteins use the process of biomineralization to incorporate metallic elements into tissues, using it to create diverse materials such as seashells, teeth, and bones. However, the way ...

A stretchy mesh heater for sore muscles

Jul 03, 2015

If you suffer from chronic muscle pain a doctor will likely recommend for you to apply heat to the injury. But how do you effectively wrap that heat around a joint? Korean Scientists at the Center for Nanoparticle ...

Polymer mold makes perfect silicon nanostructures

Jul 03, 2015

Using molds to shape things is as old as humanity. In the Bronze Age, the copper-tin alloy was melted and cast into weapons in ceramic molds. Today, injection and extrusion molding shape hot liquids into ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.