Young hockey player injuries studied

November 2, 2005

A University at Buffalo study suggests unintentional collisions and falling into boards cause more injuries among young hockey players than do body checks.

In a study that followed 2,630 boys over two seasons, results showed 55 percent of injuries were caused by unintentional collisions, while body checks accounted for only 12 percent of injuries. Seventeen percent of injuries were caused by illegal checking.

Body checking frequently has been blamed for injuries among young players, and the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended body checking be prohibited until players are at least 16 years old.

However, Barry Willer, a professor of psychiatry and rehabilitation medicine at the University at Buffalo -- part of the State University of New York system -- says waiting until players are in their teens to introduce body checking may increase the incidence of more serious injuries.

"Bringing body checking into the game at an age when players are big, strong, fast skaters fueled by testosterone, could be disastrous from an injury standpoint," the former hockey player and coach said.

Willer's study is detailed in the current issue of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Smart helmets save lives, improve rides

Related Stories

Smart helmets save lives, improve rides

November 6, 2015

As technological advancements enable people to run faster, ride farther and hit harder, experts are using sensors to collect data that could reduce head trauma incidents for football, hockey, cycling and other sports.

Motion analysis helps soccer players get their kicks

July 9, 2009

As soccer continues to grow in popularity, injuries to soccer players are likely to increase as well. Certain injuries fall into gender-based patterns and new research at Hospital for Special Surgery suggests some underlying ...

Recommended for you

Roboticists learn to teach robots from babies

December 1, 2015

Babies learn about the world by exploring how their bodies move in space, grabbing toys, pushing things off tables and by watching and imitating what adults are doing.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.