TI creates chip for mobile-phone GPS

November 21, 2005

Texas Instruments has a new chip on the market that will accommodate next-level assisted global positioning systems installed in cell phones.

TI said Monday its GPS5300 NaviLink will enable users to acquire satellite maps and even directions to stores and automated teller machines over their phones.

"A-GPS capabilities are becoming a must-have feature for third generation mobile phones in many regions around the world," said TI's Marc Cetto. "A low bill of materials, small size, low power and high performance are fundamental requirements ... all of which TI delivers with the GPS5300 NaviLink 4.0 solution."

Texas Instruments estimates that GPS chips will become a booming market in the near term with volume of around 180 million units annually by 2008.

The company said in a news release it was teaming with handset manufacturer Murata on a module option to deliver the technology to the assembly line.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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