Ohio approves SBC merger with AT&T

November 4, 2005

Ohio Friday joined the growing number of states approving the merger of SBC Communications and AT&T.

SBC said in a news release that the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has approved the merger of the two telecommunications group.

To date, the two companies have received clearance from 34 of the 36 states that need to vote on whether or not to approve the merger. Last week the Federal Communications Commission gave its approval of the deal.

Arizona is expected to vote on the issue later Friday, and the California commission will be voting Nov. 18. Once those hurdles are cleared, the two companies should be able to form one of the biggest telecommunications groups in the world.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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