Study: Tall women are more ambitious

October 5, 2005

Two Scottish researchers say they've determined tall women are more ambitious in their careers and less inclined to start a family than shorter women.

Psychologists Denis Deady of Stirling University and Miriam Law Smith of St Andrews University questioned 1,220 women from Britain, the United States, Canada and Australia, The Scotsman reported Wednesday.

The psychologists said they found taller women were less broody, had fewer children and were more ambitious. They were also more likely to have their first child at a later age.

Deady and Smith told The Scotsman they decided to conduct the research after studies suggested taller women had fewer children because they struggled to find a mate. Deady and Smith say their research disproves that theory.

"We think that tall women may have higher levels of testosterone, which may cause them to have more 'masculine' personalities," said Deady, who also stressed that did not mean taller women were unattractive.

The research appears in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: A tall story: Why do the Dutch tower over us?

Related Stories

Anthropologists study how, why we read into potential peril

January 6, 2014

They went boating alone without life vests and gave no thought to shimmying up very tall coconut trees. And although they were only figments of a writer's imagination, the fictional adventurers helped provide new insight ...

Recommended for you

How bees naturally vaccinate their babies

July 31, 2015

When it comes to vaccinating their babies, bees don't have a choice—they naturally immunize their offspring against specific diseases found in their environments. And now for the first time, scientists have discovered how ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

Exoplanets 20/20: Looking back to the future

July 31, 2015

Geoff Marcy remembers the hair standing up on the back of his neck. Paul Butler remembers being dead tired. The two men had just made history: the first confirmation of a planet orbiting another star.

Earth flyby of 'space peanut' captured in new video

July 31, 2015

NASA scientists have used two giant, Earth-based radio telescopes to bounce radar signals off a passing asteroid and produce images of the peanut-shaped body as it approached close to Earth this past weekend.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.