Survey: Companies need anti-spyware skills

October 13, 2005

A survey warns that while most corporate-network users are well aware of spyware, most admit they need more training on avoiding the potential dangers.

The poll released this week by Trend Micro concluded that 53 percent of the end users surveyed wanted more education from their IT engineers, and 40 percent actually felt that their IT people weren't doing enough to protect their systems.

Trend, which produces Internet security solutions, maintained it was critical for end users to avoid Internet behavior that could open the door to spyware invasions.

"While end users may question the effectiveness of anti-spyware solutions deployed by their IT departments, they also admit to relying heavily on IT for protection," said Ed English, Trend's chief technologist. "Many also appear willing to ignore their responsibility of ... sensible online behavior."

The Trend survey involved 1,200 end users in the United States, Japan and Germany. The Japanese respondents were more likely than the Americans and Germans to insist that their IT staff provide them with better security training.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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