Xbox goes on tour

September 8, 2005

"Game Live on Xbox," the video-game tour, has begun hitting college campuses.
Over the next two months the tour, which is also presented by Mountain Dew, is expected to reach some 50,000 videogame enthusiasts at 25 universities.

Game Live is targeted to reach the center of the game-playing community: college students. These videogame enthusiasts and trendsetters will get their first experience to play many brand-new games on this tour. Organizers also will stage Halo 2 and Madden NFL 06 competitions at each stop -- with prizes.

The tour began Sept. 8 at Southern Illinois University. The tour will end on Oct. 21 at Arizona State University. Other schools slated for tour stops include: Illinois State, West Virginia State, University of Louisville, Syracuse, Penn State, Temple, Wake Forest, University of Central Florida, Kansas State, Michigan and the University of Texas.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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