Scientists develop better sports rankings

September 22, 2005

Rochester Institute of Technology scientists Thursday announced the development of new mathematics models that provide more accurate sports rankings.

The RIT mathematicians noted there is endless debate every year concerning sports rankings, particularly when deciding the best teams in college football.

"Current sports rankings -- such as the Bowl Championship Series -- take into account many factors, but head to head competition is not emphasized enough," said Darren Narayan, assistant professor of mathematics and lead researcher of the project.

Narayan says when one team beats another, and the loser is ranked ahead of the winner, it weakens the credibility of the ranking in the eyes of the public. He said that becomes apparent when one team defeats another in the final game of the regular season, but is then ranked immediately below the team they just beat.

The model Narayan and colleagues are developing incorporates results of head-to-head competition, considering both the score and at what point of the season the game took place. He also is examining various ranking techniques involving an arbitrarily large number of teams.

Narayan hopes to present the study to various sports organizations when the research is completed.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Scientist planning to send microscopic worms into space for muscle development study

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Study shows a way to tell if your hamster is happy

July 29, 2015

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at Liverpool John Moores University in the U.K. believe they have found a way to measure happiness in hamsters. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, Emily Bethell and ...

First detection of lithium from an exploding star

July 29, 2015

The chemical element lithium has been found for the first time in material ejected by a nova. Observations of Nova Centauri 2013 made using telescopes at ESO's La Silla Observatory, and near Santiago in Chile, help to explain ...

New names and insights at Ceres

July 29, 2015

Colorful new maps of Ceres, based on data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft, showcase a diverse topography, with height differences between crater bottoms and mountain peaks as great as 9 miles (15 kilometers).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.