Documentary Highlights Physic's Miracle Year From the Dark Side

Sep 22, 2005

Bootstrap Productions is currently shooting the documentary film "The Miracle Year" about a mother on a journey into the underworld of physics as she takes on the icon of 20th century physics: Einstein. Patricia de Hilster, known as Mrs. "de", is an ordinary suburban housewife who takes up her son’s quest to find out if the theory of relativity is in fact wrong.

Filmmaker David de Hilster has been immersed in this underworld for over 12 years after having met a physicist in his home town of Long Beach, California who showed Einstein wrong in the early 1940s. Years later, with no one willing to take on the controversial and difficult subject as relativity being wrong, de Hilster enlisted himself in a documentary film seminar in Los Angeles, joined the International Documentary Association, and is now a year into production and shooting.

In order to appeal to a mass audience, David asked his mother on Mother’s day 2004 to be the main character in the film and go on a journey into the dark side of the physics world where Einstein’s fame is more of a problem than the solution. Named for the 100th year anniversary of Einstein’s “miracle year”, the film traces the journey of Mrs. de and her family in 2005 as they embark on this extraordinary journey and find their own miracle year along the way.

Expected completion of the film is in early 2006 with a theatrical release planned for late 2006. The film is expected to be between 100 and 120 minutes in length. For more information, you can go to www.themiracleyear.com

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