iPod -- the most popular incentive

August 18, 2005

The iPod Mini has become the top "motivational" or "giveaway" electronics product of U.S. corporations and small businesses, says trade magazine Incentive.

For customers who opened checking accounts and agreed to pay bills online, Bank One, Chase and Citibank have recently used free iPod Shuffles as a promotional item, reported The New York Times Thursday.

Century Tower, a residential high rise in Chicago used the iPod to lure new renters.

"It went over really big," said Sharon Campbell, the Century Tower's leasing director, who said 80 new renters received the free player.

Campbell said the apartment building had offered in the past would-be tenants incentives like one or two months of free rent, but the iPod was far more popular even though the rents range from $755 to about $3,000 a month.

IPods cost $299 to $399 for the 20-gigabyte and 60-gigabyte original models, while the iPod Mini costs $199 to $249 and the iPod Shuffle costs $99 to $129.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Review: How an iPod can be a poor man's iPhone

Related Stories

Review: How an iPod can be a poor man's iPhone

March 18, 2009

(AP) -- I try to keep a stiff upper lip about not having an iPhone. Just couldn't afford it - not with the $75 a month or so AT&T charges for service on top of the $199 upfront cost for the device.

For music buffs, Zune HD strikes right tune

October 15, 2009

In the two years I've been reviewing gadgets, I've never tested Microsoft's digital music and video player, called the Zune. The device only accounts for a tiny fraction of the market, and it had always struck me as a product ...

Apple's restriction-free music downloads create pause

February 11, 2009

When Apple Inc. announced in January that it would sell restriction-free music files, that was supposed to mean consumers could buy songs and play them on the portable gadget of their choice.

Recommended for you

Amazon deforestation leaps 16 percent in 2015

November 28, 2015

Illegal logging and clearing of Brazil's Amazon rainforest increased 16 percent in the last year, the government said, in a setback to the aim of stopping destruction of the world's greatest forest by 2030.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.