Dead fish reported on some Florida beaches

August 31, 2005

Tens of thousands of dead fish were reported this week along some Florida beaches, raising concerns about red tide.

Red tide is a toxic algae that has killed fish and other sea life in the Tampa area since January and is suspected in other fish kills, the Tallahassee (Fla.) Democrat reported Wednesday.

There were reports Tuesday of dead fish at St. George Island, Bald Point, Alligator Point and St. Teresa. Florida wildlife officials said they were collecting water samples from the areas to determine whether red tide was to blame.

However, officials told the Democrat they were not sure whether the fish died elsewhere and were carried by currents into the various regions.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Did we need the moon for life?

Related Stories

Did we need the moon for life?

November 23, 2015

For all we know, Earth is the only place in the Universe where life appeared. This makes the mystery of our existence even more puzzling. What were all the factors required to bring about the first lifeforms on our planet, ...

A 'blood rain' infiltrates villages of Spain

November 12, 2015

The rainwater that fell in some of the villages of Zamora (Spain) last autumn brought along a strange traveller: a green microalgae that turns a reddish colour when in a state of stress. Once this microalgae was deposited ...

The astounding genome of the dinoflagellate

November 5, 2015

The dinoflagellates aren't happy. In good times, these tiny ocean creatures live free-floating in the ocean or symbiotically with corals, serving up—or as—lunch to a host of mollusks, tiny fish and coral species. Some ...

Fish kills trigger red tide alerts, first responders

October 5, 2011

Acting on a tip from a constituent, Cameron County Commissioner Sofia Benavides recently drove out to a section of the Gulf Coast within her jurisdiction, Boca Chica Beach, between the mouth of the Rio Grande and the jetties ...

Recommended for you


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.