Boost takes Street Scene mobile

August 5, 2005

Boost Communications said Friday it had taken the recent Street Scene music festival mobile with text-messaging promotions.

The company said that thousands have responded from their cell phones to win prizes and backstage passes Boost Communications Inc.,, a mobile interactivity company for radio entertainment and sports, partnered with the Street Scene 05 music festival to further establish mobile promotions as the standard in live entertainment events, the company said in a release.The two-day festival held July 29-30, 2005, on the Qualcomm Stadium grounds in San Diego, Calif.,, generated thousands of text-message responses from event attendees participating in an array of innovative promotions.In addition to reaching audience members through this mobile channel, the promotions created an entirely new source of revenue for Street Scene.

With headline acts like the Black Eyed Peas, Pixies and the Killers, Street Scene drew over 75,000 attendees to San Diego.As one of the largest, most well attended, and best produced music festivals in the country, Street Scene sets the standard for summer concert experiences on the West Coast and around the country.

This year Street Scene raised the bar for concert events by partnering with Boost Communications to offer attendees the immediacy and convenience of text-based promotions to win a series of prizes including Xbox consoles, Southwest Airlines roundtrip tickets, Taylor guitars, Best Buy merchandise, VIP passes, backstage passes and more.

"As one of the top shows in the country each year, we know people expect us to provide entertainment and promotions that enhance the concert-going experience and offer exciting opportunities," said Rob Hagey, CEO of Rob Hagey Productions and producer of Street Scene."Based on the response levels, we know mobile interaction is a highly advantageous promotional channel.By building our relationship with Boost Communications, the company that is setting the standard for mobile interaction, we are looking forward to pushing the envelope in years to come."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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