Spacemen plan short Soyuz ride

July 16, 2005

The residents of the International Space Station are planning a short ride in their Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and Flight Engineer John Phillips will leave the space station at 6:35 a.m. EDT, Tuesday. They will undock the Soyuz capsule from the Pirs Docking Compartment and fly a few feet to re-dock on the Zarya Module.

The re-docking will allow the crew to use the Pirs for a scheduled spacewalk in August. Krikalev and Phillips are in the third month of a planned six-month mission. NASA TV will carry the trip live, starting at 6 a.m. EDT, Tuesday.

On Aug. 16, Krikalev will surpass the record for most cumulative time spent in space by any person, more than 749 days on six space flights.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Russian cosmonaut back after record 879 days in space

Related Stories

No Show Leaves LEO A Space Duet

July 18, 2005

The Space Station Expedition 11 crew worked last week on final preparations for the arrival of the Space Shuttle Discovery on its Return to Flight mission (STS-114).

International Space Station Expedition 11 Moving Full Speed

May 8, 2005

Commander Sergei Krikalev and Flight Engineer John Phillips are moving full speed ahead into their Expedition 11 maintenance and science work aboard the International Space Station. Krikalev replaced a liquid processing component ...

Space station on to the 2nd decade

October 29, 2010

The second decade of a new era in human history -- when not everyone lives on our home planet -- begins Nov. 2, 2010, as the International Space Station crosses the 1.5 billion mile mark of its travels with six residents ...

World's Third Space Tourist Ready For Journey

September 12, 2005

The world's third space tourist Gregory Olsen has been given the go ahead for his Oct 1 flight to the International Space Station aboard a Russian vehicle, a space official said.

Recommended for you

A common mechanism for human and bird sound production

November 27, 2015

When birds and humans sing it sounds completely different, but now new research reported in the journal Nature Communications shows that the very same physical mechanisms are at play when a bird sings and a human speaks.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.