Sliver solar technology does it again

June 30, 2005
Sliver solar technology does it again

Solar technology developed at The Australian National University has won its second environmental award in less than a month.
SLIVER solar cells, invented at the Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems at ANU in collaboration with Origin Energy, have won a Global 100 Eco-Tech Award to be presented at the 2005 World Expo in Aichi, Japan.

The technology was recognised by the Japanese solar industry for its potential to prevent global warming.

“This second win is further reward for the years of dedication by CSES and Origin researchers and ongoing confirmation of the potential of SLIVER technology to revolutionise the solar energy industry,” said Mr Ray Prowse, Manager of the Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems.

A team of professors and senior management officials from Japan’s universities, research institutes and environmental organisations screened competition entries for the Global 100 Eco-Tech Award through a comprehensive assessment considering:
· The contribution to resolving global environmental problems and realising a sustainable future.
· The novelty of the technology appropriate to 21st century society.
· Its universality, that is, its usefulness in different societies.

SLIVER is a unique monocrystalline solar photovoltaic technology that uses dramatically less silicon than other solar cells. Small volumes of SLIVER panels are now being produced at a dedicated Origin Energy plant in Adelaide, South Australia and the solar team is working towards producing larger modules for scale production in coming years.

The award will be presented at a ceremony on Thursday, 1 September at the World Expo 2005.

Source: Australian National University

Explore further: Median installed price of solar in the United States fell by 5-12 percent in 2015

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