A filter that enhances the power of communications satellites

February 3, 2005

Researchers at the Public University of Navarre are designing and developing a filter that enhances the power of communications satellites for the European Space Agency. The filter enables the reduction, by a factor of a million, interference produced by what is known as the “Field Emission Effect”.

The work developed by the Navarre researchers is in its final stages and its results have been satisfactory, given that the filter devised enables the reduction of interference produced by a factor of a million and avoids the possible destruction of components. These results may form a new standard for the aerospace industry given the significant saving in size and weight - vital factors in the sector.

The project entitled “ESTEC contract High Power Filter” has been concluded successfully after nearly two years of work.

Patent application

More precisely, the European Space Agency was trying to resolve the problems produced in communications satellites by what is known as the “Field Emission Effect”. Communications satellites need to emit with more power both for signal quality reasons as well as because of the need to cover wider geographical zones. The problem is when a satellite emitter goes beyond the power threshold, an effect that deteriorates the components and the aerials arises. This is what we technically know as the Corona and Multipactor Effect. Its origin lies in the fact that high power levels produce very intense electromagnetic fields. These very intense fields in very low-pressure conditions generate an avalanche of electrons on to metals that can become destructive and cause losses in heavy investment.

The project developed by researchers at Public University of Navarre has worked on the design of a filter that eliminates this effect, enabling work at the desired power levels.

The results have been so positive that the research team, together with the ESA, have applied for an international patent for the filter for its commercialisation.

Explore further: Close-up film shows for the first time how ants use 'combs' and 'brushes' to keep their antennae clean

Related Stories

Project uses crowd computing to improve water filtration

July 6, 2015

Nearly 800 million people worldwide don't have access to safe drinking water, and some 2.5 billion people live in precariously unsanitary conditions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Together, ...

Recommended for you

How bees naturally vaccinate their babies

July 31, 2015

When it comes to vaccinating their babies, bees don't have a choice—they naturally immunize their offspring against specific diseases found in their environments. And now for the first time, scientists have discovered how ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

Exoplanets 20/20: Looking back to the future

July 31, 2015

Geoff Marcy remembers the hair standing up on the back of his neck. Paul Butler remembers being dead tired. The two men had just made history: the first confirmation of a planet orbiting another star.

Earth flyby of 'space peanut' captured in new video

July 31, 2015

NASA scientists have used two giant, Earth-based radio telescopes to bounce radar signals off a passing asteroid and produce images of the peanut-shaped body as it approached close to Earth this past weekend.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.