Sun Unveils Next Generation Client Technology

December 14, 2004

Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq: SUNW) today unveiled its next generation Sun Ray Server Software 3.0 an interoperable, platform that enables instant, secure access to corporate applications and data from broadband-enabled home, satellite and remote offices. Sun also introduced the Sun Ray 170, a sleek new innovative desktop client.

Together, Sun Ray Server Software 3.0 and the Sun Ray 170 ultra-thin client further extend Sun Ray technology to run over DSL or broadband connections beyond traditional in-house networks. This functionality allows customers to truly bridge mobility with security utilizing either Solaris Operating System or Linux OS-based environments.

Sun Ray technology delivers a secure, easy-to-use remote work environment. By combining Java Card(tm) technology for increased levels of authentication with the absence of a local operating system that could be hacked, Sun Ray clients are virtually immune from virus attacks.

With Sun Ray technology, our customers are empowered to mobilize their workforce while maintaining control over data and intellectual property," said Fred Kohout, vice president, marketing, Client Systems Group at Sun Microsystems. "Unique to all Sun Ray clients is an integrated smart card reader. By simply using a Java Card technology-enabled smart card employees can securely access their work environment at home, remove the card, commute to work and reinsert the Java Card into a corporate system to continue exactly where they left off."

Sun Ray Server Software 3.0
Sun Ray Server Software 3.0 creates a secure, cost-effective, low-administration desktop environment for enterprise, government, and technical customers. The software runs on both the Solaris Operating System and Linux, and supports every Sun Ray client Sun has ever shipped.

Sun Ray Software 3.0 uses sophisticated bandwidth adaptation and management technology to reduce bandwidth requirements for Sun Ray clients by more than half while still delivering a full, rich desktop experience. Sun Ray clients can now be connected over the same broadband connections found in homes to access corporate applications and data to enable a new mobile, highly secure workforce. Outstanding user performance is maintained by employing the aggressive compression techniques, including Discrete Wavelet Transform compression for images and Lemple Ziv 77 for text and data.

New features include:
Support for Linux, including the Sun Java(tm) Desktop System Software, SuSE Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
Reduced bandwidth usage to enable a remotely deployed Sun Ray client via DSL or cable modem connections.
Expanded peripheral support and administrator flexibility to control peripheral access for enhanced security.
Support for the PC/SC smart card framework that enables advanced smart card middleware applications from Sun and third party providers. These applications can enable multi-factor authentication via smart cards using PKCS#11, S/MIME digital signature message signing and encryption.

Sun Ray 170
The Sun Ray Ultra-Thin Client 170 integrates Sun Ray client functionality with a 17-inch flat panel display into a sleek and elegant design. The compact design is ideal for tight desktop spaces such as call centers. The Sun Ray 170 ultra-thin client is easy to install and requires no configuration -- just plug it into a configured network. Its projector port makes this unit excellent for meeting rooms, allowing presenters to enter a conference room with just a smart card rather than a laptop.

The Sun Ray 170 is ideal for home offices because of its innovative design, silent operation and small desktop footprint. It can also be used as an external display, and provides 56% higher resolution and 36% more viewing area than the previous model, the Sun Ray Ultra-Thin Client 150.

For more information about the Sun Ray product line, please visit .

Explore further: Sun Extends Sun Ray Technology to Linux Environments

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