World's Smallest Gyro-Sensor

August 3, 2004
Epson Giro sensor.jpg

Seiko Epson Corporation ("Epson") today announced that a joint development effort with NGK Insulators, Ltd. ("NGK") has succeeded in developing the smallest*1 gyro-sensor of its kind in the world. The XV-3500CB, as the new gyro-sensor is being called, is scheduled to enter volume production in December 2004 and represents Epson's first salvo in a battle to expand the scope of its quartz crystal device business.

The new gyro sensor boasts unprecedented stability thanks to the use of a monocrystalline quartz crystal for the newly developed gyro element. By leveraging Epson's original crystal microprocessing technology, low-power analog circuit technology, and packaging technology, the joint development team was able to achieve a gyro sensor measuring just 5.0 mm x 3.2 mm x 1.3 mm, making it the world's smallest gyro-sensor with built-in drive circuitry.

This subminiature angular velocity sensor is ideally designed for use in systems that correct camera vibrations. The sensor will enable compact digital cameras, camera-phones, and other products to be equipped with a high-performance motion correction feature.

Epson is looking beyond its conventional domain in the timing-device market and is actively participating in the sensor market, which it has targeted as a new business area. Going forward, the company's efforts will be directed further toward the development of new products using motion detection sensors. Product development efforts will range from game machines, remote-control security devices, and so forth on the low end, all the way to navigation systems, attitude-control (gyroscope) applications and similar systems on the high end.

Specifications of the product here.

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