Philips introduces High Performance Automotive TrenchMOS MOSFETs in LFPAK

August 30, 2004

New devices offer enhanced thermal performance in compact packaging

Expanding its portfolio of automotive power solutions, Royal Philips Electronics today announced the availability of its High Performance Automotive (HPA) TrenchMOS™ MOSFETs in Philips’ innovative loss-free packaging (LFPAK). Combining its expertise in automotive and TrenchMOS technology, Philips has developed these devices to meet the specific requirements of the automotive industry. Featuring enhanced thermal performance in extremely compact packaging, Philips’ MOSFETs in LFPAK are especially ideal for demanding applications such as engine management systems and automotive motor drives.

Philips’ LFPAK blends the small-size advantages of the SO8 package with the superior thermal properties of much larger packages such as DPAK. This enables design engineers to improve the performance of applications and conserve board space – two key considerations. The enhanced thermal characteristics offer faster switching and allow heat to be dissipated easily while maintaining the lowest possible operating temperature. The LFPAK also conducts a significant amount of power upwards and out through the source lead, giving it thermal resistances significantly lower than SO8, and comparable with much larger packages such as DPAK and D2PAK.

The BUK9Y19-55B, BUK9Y40-55B and BUK9Y30-75B are new devices being introduced that leverage the advantages of this technology. All three devices operate at logic level and are rated at 175Cel.

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