Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) is one of the world s leading scientific journals in astronomy and astrophysics. It has been in continuous existence since 1827 and publishes peer-reviewed letters and papers reporting original research in relevant fields. Despite the name, the journal is no longer monthly nor does it carry the notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The first issue of MNRAS was published on 9 February 1827 as Monthly Notices of the Astronomical Society of London and it has been in continuous publication ever since. It took its current name from the second volume, after the Astronomical Society of London became the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). Until 1960 it carried the monthly notices of the RAS, at which time these were transferred to the newly-established Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society (1960–1996) and then to its successor journal Astronomy & Geophysics (since 1997). Until 1965, MNRAS was published in-house by the RAS; since then, it has been published by Blackwell Scientific Publications (later Wiley-Blackwell) on behalf of the RAS. As well, the journal is no longer monthly, with thirty-six issues a year

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell (publisher) Wiley-Blackwell for the Royal Astronomical Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1827–present
Impact factor
5.185 (2008)
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When did galaxies settle down?

Astronomers have long sought to understand exactly how the universe evolved from its earliest history to the cosmos we see around us in the present day. In particular, the way that galaxies form and develop ...

Oct 30, 2014
4.6 / 5 (14) 19

Big black holes can block new stars

Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.

Oct 21, 2014
4.6 / 5 (12) 18

Astronomers unveil secrets of giant elliptical galaxies

New findings of how giant elliptical galaxies move have been discovered by an international team of astronomers using the newly installed Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) ...

Sep 12, 2014
5 / 5 (6) 0

This star cluster is not what it seems

This new image from the VLT Survey Telescope in northern Chile shows a vast collection of stars, the globular cluster Messier 54. This cluster looks similar to many others but it has a secret. Messier 54 ...

Sep 10, 2014
4.1 / 5 (14) 0

How do planets form?

We have a pretty good idea of how planets form around stars. We know that dust is formed from the remnants of supernovae, that protoplanetary disks of dust form around young stars, and that dust grains can ...

Sep 09, 2014
4.9 / 5 (11) 25

NuSTAR sees rare blurring of black hole light

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has captured an extreme and rare event in the regions immediately surrounding a supermassive black hole. A compact source of X-rays that sits near the ...

Aug 12, 2014
4.5 / 5 (35) 12