Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) is one of the world s leading scientific journals in astronomy and astrophysics. It has been in continuous existence since 1827 and publishes peer-reviewed letters and papers reporting original research in relevant fields. Despite the name, the journal is no longer monthly nor does it carry the notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The first issue of MNRAS was published on 9 February 1827 as Monthly Notices of the Astronomical Society of London and it has been in continuous publication ever since. It took its current name from the second volume, after the Astronomical Society of London became the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). Until 1960 it carried the monthly notices of the RAS, at which time these were transferred to the newly-established Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society (1960–1996) and then to its successor journal Astronomy & Geophysics (since 1997). Until 1965, MNRAS was published in-house by the RAS; since then, it has been published by Blackwell Scientific Publications (later Wiley-Blackwell) on behalf of the RAS. As well, the journal is no longer monthly, with thirty-six issues a year

Wiley-Blackwell (publisher) Wiley-Blackwell for the Royal Astronomical Society
United Kingdom
Impact factor
5.185 (5.185)
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Hotspots in an active galactic nucleus

The nucleus of a so-called "active" galaxy contains a massive black hole that is vigorously accreting material. As a result, the nucleus often ejects bipolar jets of rapidly moving charged particles that radiate brightly ...

dateOct 24, 2016 in Astronomy
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Preparing to study the epoch of reionization

The epoch when the very first stars appeared is a key period of cosmic history. These stars began the manufacture of the chemical elements (those heavier than hydrogen and helium) and their light began the reionization of ...

dateOct 10, 2016 in Astronomy
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Charting the slow death of the Universe

An international team of astronomers studying more than 200 000 galaxies has measured the energy generated within a large portion of space more precisely than ever before. This represents the most comprehensive assessment ...

dateAug 10, 2015 in Astronomy
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