Astronomical Journal

The Astronomical Journal (often abbreviated AJ in scientific papers and references) is a peer-reviewed monthly scientific journal owned by the American Astronomical Society and currently published by Institute of Physics Publishing. It is one of the premier journals for astronomy in the world. Until 2008, the journal was published by the University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Astronomical Society. The reason for the change were given by the society as the desire of the University of Chicago Press to revise its financial arrangement and their plans to change from the particular software that had been developed in-house. The other two publications of the society, the Astrophysical Journal and its supplement series, followed in January 2009. The journal was established in 1849 by Benjamin A. Gould. It ceased publication in 1861 due to the American Civil War, but resumed in 1885. Between 1909 and 1941 the journal was edited in Albany, New York. In 1941, editor Benjamin Boss arranged to transfer responsibility for the journal to the American Astronomical Society. The first electronic edition of The Astronomical Journal was published in January, 1998. With the July, 2006

Publisher
Institute of Physics Publishing for the American Astronomical Society
Country
United States
History
1849–present
Impact factor
4.548 (2010)
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Tail discovered on long-known asteroid

A two-person team of Carnegie's Scott Sheppard and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory has discovered a new active asteroid, called 62412, in the Solar System's main asteroid belt between Mars and ...

Nov 11, 2014
4.8 / 5 (11) 8

New star catalog reveals unexpected 'solar salad'

(Phys.org) —An Arizona State University alumnus has devised the largest catalog ever produced for stellar compositions. Called the Hypatia Catalog, after one of the first female astronomers who lived in ...

Aug 19, 2014
5 / 5 (3) 0

A sharp eye on Southern binary stars

Unlike our sun, with its retinue of orbiting planets, many stars in the sky orbit around a second star. These binary stars, with orbital periods ranging from days to centuries, have long been the primary ...

Apr 17, 2014
3.4 / 5 (5) 0

Hubble probes interior of Tarantula Nebula

Like lifting a giant veil, the near-infrared vision of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope uncovers a dazzling new view deep inside the Tarantula Nebula. Hubble reveals a glittering treasure trove of more than ...

Jan 09, 2014
4.9 / 5 (8) 0 | with audio podcast

Drawing the line between stars and brown dwarfs

(Phys.org) —Stars come in a tremendous size range, from many tens of times bigger than the Sun to a tiny fraction of its size. But the answer to just how small an astronomical body can be, and still be ...

Dec 10, 2013
4.5 / 5 (10) 0 | with audio podcast

Galaxy growth examined like rings of a tree

(Phys.org) —Watching a tree grow might be more frustrating than waiting for a pot to boil, but luckily for biologists, there are tree rings. Beginning at a tree trunk's dense core and moving out to the ...

Nov 01, 2013
4.8 / 5 (12) 3 | with audio podcast

A video map of motions in the nearby universe

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, including University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer Brent Tully, has mapped the motions of structures of the nearby universe in greater detail than ever ...

Jun 12, 2013
4.7 / 5 (62) 169 | with audio podcast