Archive: 7/10/2013

Enzyme catalysis unravelled in new research

(Phys.org) —New research by the School of Chemistry has significantly advanced our understanding of how enzymes (proteins) increase the rate of chemical reaction. Now potentially able to achieve greater control of enzyme ...

dateOct 07, 2013 in Biochemistry
shares0 comments 1

The key to the treasure in wood

(Phys.org) —In future, it could be easier to break down wood, as a source of raw materials, into its constituent parts. Chemists at the Max Planck Institut für Kohlenforschung in Mülheim an der Ruhr have found an efficient ...

dateOct 07, 2013 in Materials Science
shares0 comments 2

Researchers use science to predict success

We all want to know the secret to success and physicists are no different. Like the rest of the academic community, physicists rely on various quantitative factors to determine whether a researcher will enjoy long-term success. ...

dateOct 07, 2013 in Mathematics
shares0 comments 0

Salt-tolerant bacteria improve crop yields

Uzbek microbiologist Dilfuza Egamberdieva, group leader at the National University of Uzbekistan, at Tashkent, has isolated salt-tolerant bacterial strains that live in salt-degraded soils, where they help the rooting process ...

dateOct 07, 2013 in Biotechnology
shares0 comments 0

Precarious employment on the rise

Ontario's economy, and its traditional economic stronghold in the Toronto region, are slowly returning to pre-recessionary levels of employment. Yet there has been growing concern about the kinds of jobs the economy is creating. ...

dateOct 07, 2013 in Economics & Business
shares0 comments 0

Top banks launch integrated messenger service

Leading banks have teamed up with financial data provider Thomson Reuters to launch a shared messenger service to facilitate communication between traders, British information services company Markit announced on Monday.

dateOct 07, 2013 in Internet
shares0 comments 0

'White graphene' halts rust in high temps

(Phys.org) —Atomically thin sheets of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have the handy benefit of protecting what's underneath from oxidizing even at very high temperatures, Rice University researchers have discovered.

dateOct 07, 2013 in Nanomaterials
shares0 comments 3