Archive: 08/26/2009

'Hedgehog' pathway may hold key to anti-cancer therapy

Scientists in Switzerland have discovered a way to block the growth of human colon cancer cells, preventing the disease from reaching advanced stages and the development of liver metastases. The research, published today ...

dateAug 26, 2009 in Cancer
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Global priority regions for carnivore conservation

Finding economical and practical solutions for conserving endangered carnivores is a continuous challenge for conservationists. In a study published by the peer reviewed open access journal, PLoS ONE, on August 27th, a team ...

dateAug 26, 2009 in Ecology
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Study shines light on night-time alertness

The circadian system is not the only pathway involved in determining alertness at night. Research described in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience showed that red light, which does not stimulate the circadian system ...

dateAug 26, 2009 in Neuroscience
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Solar Mystery Solved

(PhysOrg.com) -- Solar flares are amongst the most dangerous cosmic phenomena man has ever known. Though they pose no harm to humans, their effect on technology is vast. When they occur, they possess the capability ...

dateAug 26, 2009 in General Physics weblog
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Northwest fears that invasive mussels are headed its way

Highly invasive mussels are lurking on the Northwest's doorstep, threatening to gum up the dams that produce the region's cheap electricity, clog drinking water and irrigation systems, jeopardize aquatic ecosystems and upset ...

dateAug 26, 2009 in Ecology
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Witty tweets captured in 'Twitter Wit' book

A freshly released book "Twitter Wit" is a hit at the hip micro-blogging service, which so loved the compendium of clever tweets that it bought copies for everyone in its San Francisco headquarters.

dateAug 26, 2009 in Internet
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Results show math, science aren't out of reach

The conflicting data coming out about schools can make your head swirl. Too few kids ready for college. Too few students mastering their subjects. Too many teens trailing their global peers in math and science.

dateAug 26, 2009 in Other
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