Archive: 04/2/2007

China's earliest modern human

Researchers at WUSTL and the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing have been studying a 40,000-year-old early modern human skeleton found in China and have determined ...

dateApr 02, 2007 in Archaeology & Fossils
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Why the Rich Get Richer

A new theory shows how wealth, in different forms, can stick to some but not to others. The findings have implications ranging from the design of the Internet to economics.

dateApr 02, 2007 in Other
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Picky-eater Flies Losing Smell Genes

A UC Davis researcher is hot on the scent of some lost fruit fly genes. According to population biology graduate student Carolyn McBride, the specialist fruit fly Drosophila sechellia is losing genes for smell and taste receptors ...

dateApr 02, 2007 in
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Iowa proposal reflects allergy crisis

A proposal in Iowa's Waukee Community School District to discourage having peanut products around area students has brought attention to a national issue.

dateApr 02, 2007 in Other
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Diamonds are forever... diverse

A post-doctoral fellow at McGill University has discovered that diamonds may well be forever, but their origins are not necessarily as clear-cut as commonly believed.

dateApr 02, 2007 in Condensed Matter
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Novel experiments on cement yield concrete results

Using a brace of the most modern tools of materials research, a team from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Northwestern University has shed new light on one of mankind’s older construction materials—cement.

dateApr 02, 2007 in Nanomaterials
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Gene induces eyes in odd spots

A gene thought to play a relatively minor role in eye development is powerful enough on its own to initiate the formation of eyes in strange spots on a fruit fly's body, Indiana University Bloomington scientists ...

dateApr 02, 2007 in
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Laser Goes Tubing for Faster Body-Fluid Tests

University of Rochester researchers announce in the current issue of Applied Optics a technique that in 60 seconds or less measures multiple chemicals in body fluids, using a laser, white light, and a reflective tube. The te ...

dateApr 02, 2007 in Medical research
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