Archive: 11/17/2006

Scrap tires can be used to filter wastewater

Every year, the United State produces millions of scrap tires that clog landfills and become breeding areas for pests. Finding adequate uses for castoff tires is a continuing challenge and illegal dumping has become a serious ...

Nov 17, 2006
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Learning the magnetic ropes

At the Sun's edge, in a region called the heliosphere, magnetic fields and electrical currents align and twist themselves in massive three-dimensional structures called "magnetic flux ropes." As these ropes kink, they become ...

Nov 17, 2006
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Dendritic cells stimulate cancer-cell growth

Since their discovery at Rockefeller University some 30 years ago, dendritic cells have been recognized as key players on the immune-system team, presenting antigens to other immune cells to help them respond to novel insults. ...

Nov 17, 2006
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X-ray Transit of Mercury

To appreciate the majesty and power of a typical G-type star, you need only glance at this photo... The tiny black speck is Mercury. The star looming in the background is our own sun.

Nov 17, 2006
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Ulysses embarks on third set of polar passes

On 17 November, the joint ESA-NASA Ulysses mission will reach another important milestone on its epic out-of-ecliptic journey: the start of the third passage over the Sun's south pole.

Nov 17, 2006
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Rare lightshow seen in deep ocean

Rare footage of marine creatures putting on deep sea 'lightshows' on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean has been captured by scientists using the latest technology. So many animals were squirting luminescence into the water ...

Nov 17, 2006
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Setting the stage to find drugs against SARS

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have set the stage for the rapid identification of compounds to fight against severe acquired respiratory syndrome (SARS), the atypical ...

Nov 17, 2006
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DNA code breaker tested theory on Jane Austen text

A researcher at the University of Bradford has perfected a computer programme that could unlock the secrets of the human genome and pave the way towards new treatments and drugs sooner than had been expected.

Nov 17, 2006
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