Archive: 07/15/2011

Explaining Antarctic ozone hole anomalies

The strongly reduced Antarctic stratospheric ozone hole destruction in 2010 and several other recent years results from the occurrence of dramatic meteorological events in the polar winter, known as sudden stratospheric warmings ...

Jul 15, 2011
not rated yet 0

Conducting energy on a nano scale

Modern electronics as we know them, from televisions to computers, depend on conducting materials that can control electronic properties. As technology shrinks down to pocket sized communications devices and microchips that ...

Jul 15, 2011
4 / 5 (4) 0 | with audio podcast

Looking ahead to local climate models

When research scientist Jim Kinter describes the interactions between the Earth's ocean, land and atmosphere, he talks of dancing. "The atmosphere and the ocean, and the atmosphere and the land surface have ...

Jul 15, 2011
5 / 5 (2) 5 | with audio podcast

Too much customer contact can hurt business

Research conducted by an SMU marketing professor and two associates reveals that businesses can go too far when trying to keep in touch with customers, who are easily driven away by too many emails, phone calls and mailers.

Jul 15, 2011
not rated yet 2

Graphene gives up more of its secrets

Graphene, a sheet of carbon only a single atom thick, was an object of theoretical speculation long before it was actually made. Theory predicts extraordinary properties for graphene, but testing the predictions ...

Jul 15, 2011
4.8 / 5 (12) 0 | with audio podcast

A manganite changes its stripes

If there were a Hall of Fame for materials, manganites would be among its members. Some manganites, compounds of manganese oxides, are renowned for colossal magnetoresistance – the ability to suddenly ...

Jul 15, 2011
5 / 5 (3) 14 | with audio podcast