Taiwan scientists develop sperm 'efficiency' kit

Sep 17, 2009

Scientists in Taiwan said Thursday they have invented a male fertility home test kit that breaks new ground by measuring the efficiency of sperm cells -- a key factor in determining men's ability to father children.

The kit, developed at National Taiwan University, gives a numerical measure of sperm cells' motility -- ability to reach an egg.

" is often caused by lifestyle, such as or tobacco use. So if people change their lifestyles, they will be able to use the kit to monitor their progress," said Andrew Wo, head of the team that carried out the research.

Similar products, also designed for home use, already exist on the market, but the focus has so far been on the quantity of the , not the quality, according to the developers of the new kit.

Wo said he expected the product to appeal to women who feel they are being blamed for childless marriages.

"Maybe they think it's not their fault and they'll buy the kit for their husbands to show they're right," said Wo.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Growing a blood vessel in a week

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Growing a blood vessel in a week

11 hours ago

The technology for creating new tissues from stem cells has taken a giant leap forward. Three tablespoons of blood are all that is needed to grow a brand new blood vessel in just seven days. This is shown ...

Testing time for stem cells

13 hours ago

DefiniGEN is one of the first commercial opportunities to arise from Cambridge's expertise in stem cell research. Here, we look at some of the fundamental research that enables it to supply liver and pancreatic ...

Team finds key signaling pathway in cause of preeclampsia

Oct 23, 2014

A team of researchers led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology has published findings that provide novel insight into the cause of preeclampsia, the leading cause ...

Rapid test to diagnose severe sepsis

Oct 23, 2014

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately.

User comments : 0