Scientists call for tighter regulations on food adverts during children's TV viewing

Oct 28, 2010

Psychologists at the University of Liverpool have called for tighter advertising regulations after a study revealed unhealthy foods are more likely to be advertised during children's peak viewing times than at any other point in the broadcasting schedule.

The researchers, in partnership with the Cancer Council, Australia, studied 12,618 food advertisements from 11 countries and found that 67 per cent endorsed unhealthy food. The research builds on a previous study at Liverpool which revealed that children would consume twice as many calories from snacks after watching food adverts compared to after viewing for toys and games.

The research reveals that Germany, Spain and Greece have the highest frequency of adverts promoting unhealthy foods during children's peak viewing time, compared to other European countries and parts of the US, Canada and Australia. These adverts tend to feature child-orientated persuasive techniques, such as the use of popular animated characters and celebrities.

Although the US, Canada and Australia have a lower rate of unhealthy food advertising overall, broadcasters still air the adverts more frequently during a time when children are watching.

Dr Jason Halford, Director of the Kissileff Laboratory for the Study of Human Ingestive Behaviour at the University of Liverpool said: "Obesity in young children is now a major health concern all across the world. Our studies highlight that there are global connections between advertising, food preferences and consumption. Our previous research showed that snacking on unhealthy food doubled after a child had watched a series of 'junk' food adverts. This new study demonstrates that children are specifically targeted and repeatedly overexposed to large quantities of adverts for these products.

"Young children are less aware of the persuasive intent of advertising, which makes them more susceptible to its marketing purposes. Current regulations on advertising only take into account the proportion of children watching, not the actual number. We hope this work will contribute to a review of regulations concerning the type and amount of advertisements shown during the times when children are most likely to be watching."

Emma Boyland, lead UK researcher on the project, added: "Regulations on unhealthy food advertisements were first enforced in Sweden, where companies must not generate television advertisements targeted specifically towards children under the age of 12. The UK has reformed its own regulations, but these restrictions only apply to programmes that have a certain proportion of children in the audience, rather than being based on the actual number of children watching. This means that a significant number of could be watching among an adult audience.

"Our work suggests that further study is necessary to ensure that TV regulations are appropriate and effective at reducing children's exposure to advertising in the UK. An additional study would also indicate whether or not this legislation could be applied elsewhere to lessen the frequency of such advertising internationally."

Explore further: AMA examines economic impact of physicians

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Advertising Child's Play

Dec 10, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Children on their way to school are five times more likely to see the advertising of soft drinks, alcohol, ice-cream and confectionary than ads for healthy foods.

Children who watch more TV are fatter

Feb 26, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Pre-school children who watch a lot of television are considerably fatter than those who don’t, according to a major new study.

Do TV ads affect children's diet, obesity?

Feb 22, 2010

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago Institute for Health Research and Policy have received a $2.2 million federal grant to determine whether or not TV food advertising affects children's diet, physical activity ...

Recommended for you

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

6 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

6 hours ago

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

6 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.