Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet helps summer travelers beat jet lag

May 31, 2007

With the summer travel season beginning, many travelers are beating jet lag with the Anti-Jet-Lag Diet developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory.

A study published in 2002 in the medical journal Military Medicine found that travelers who use the Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet are seven times less likely to experience jet lag when traveling west and 16 times less likely when traveling east. A copy of the study (16 MB PDF file) is online at AntiJetLagDiet.com.

"Anyone traveling across three or more time zones can use the Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet to eliminate or reduce jet lag," said Argonne 's Dave Baurac. "The Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet uses the same natural time cues that nature uses to maintain our healthy cellular rhythms, such as meal contents and timing, light and dark cycles and daily activity cycles."

Jet lag symptoms include feelings of irritability, insomnia, indigestion and general disorientation that occur when the body's inner clock is out of step with environmental time cues like meal times, sunrise and sunset, and daily cycles of rest and activity.

Free information about the Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet and how to use it is online at www.AntiJetLagDiet.com/faqs.asp.

Invented by Charles Ehret, an Argonne biologist whose career was devoted to the study of daily biological rhythms in a variety of organisms from paramecia to mammals, the Anti-Jet-Lag Diet has helped hundreds of thousands of travelers avoid jet lag.

Over the last 25 years, Argonne has provided information about the Anti-Jet-Lag Diet to President Ronald Reagan, the U.S. Army and Navy, the U.S. Secret Service, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the World Bank, the Federal Reserve System, the Canadian National Swim Team, and dozens of corporations, scout groups, church groups, travel groups and individual travelers.

For a small fee, visitors to the AntiJetLgDiet.com Web site can also use Argonne-developed software to calculate a detailed Anti-Jet-Lag Diet plan tailored to their specific itinerary. Argonne has licensed the software, written by Baurac, exclusively to AntiJetLagDiet.com LLC.

Source: Argonne National Laboratory

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