Black Death-type bacteria found in trash

May 07, 2007

Bacteria from the same family as the Black Death was recently found inside British trash cans that are only emptied once every two weeks.

A health hazards study found among some of the trash cans collected every 14 days, a strain of bacteria eerily similar to that of the one that killed 75 million people during the Middle Ages, The Daily Mail said Monday.

The study found some of the bacteria found in the receptacles were from the exact family from which the yersinia pestis strain originated centuries ago.

Such troubling findings were included in the study's report, which suggested garbage collection in certain areas of Britain be increased to prevent potential health hazards.

"As we endeavor to drive the population to meet national and local recycling targets with a system of biweekly curbside collection, the potential biohazards associated should not be overlooked," the report from the University of Northampton's SITA Center said.

The Daily Mail said that the center recommended more stringent garbage collection procedures, as well as advancements in refuse containment and deposition.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Tracking spending among the commercially insured

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Intel says world's smallest 3G modem has been launched

34 minutes ago

Analysts say why not. Intel is going after its own comfortable stake in the mobile market, where connectivity for wearables and "Internet of Things" household items will be in high demand. Intel on Tuesday ...

Wolves susceptible to yawn contagion

1 hour ago

Wolves may be susceptible to yawn contagion, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Teresa Romero from The University of Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues.

Orphaned children can do just as well in institutions

1 hour ago

The removal of institutions or group homes will not lead to better child well-being and could even worsen outcomes for some orphaned and separated children, according to new findings from a three-year study across five low- ...

Bronze Age wine cellar found

1 hour ago

A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and colleagues.

Recommended for you

Tracking spending among the commercially insured

3 minutes ago

Recent growth in health care spending for commercially insured individuals is due primarily to increases in prices for medical services, rather than increased use, according to a new study led by researchers at The Dartmouth ...

Taking aim at added sugars to improve Americans' health

4 hours ago

Now that health advocates' campaigns against trans-fats have largely succeeded in sidelining the use of the additive, they're taking aim at sugar for its potential contributions to Americans' health conditions. But scientists ...

Drink up for exercise, but not too much

6 hours ago

With students heading back to school, fall sports are in full swing. In addition to training, eating right, and getting enough sleep, a significant key to health and performance is staying hydrated. However, the recent tragic ...

User comments : 0