British healthcare may be rationed

May 07, 2007

Doctors in Britain are revealing for the first time that many health treatments will need to be rationed in the future.

The Observer reported on the move, which is expected to embarrass the government. The reason for rationing treatments, doctors have said, is that the National Health System cannot cope with skyrocketing demands from patients.

In a forthcoming report, the British Medical Association is predicting rations on fertility treatments, migraine headache treatments, plastic surgery operations for varicose veins and treatments for minor childhood ailments, among other treatments and procedures.

James Johnson, the BMA chairman, said patients may face trouble in the future, increasingly being denied treatments.

Health Minister Andy Burnham defended the NHS, saying that despite certain troubles, the system is a model for providing care to a national population.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers developing an artificial vision system for prosthetic legs to improve gait

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study shows troubling rise in use of animals in experiments

Feb 25, 2015

Despite industry claims of reduced animal use as well as federal laws and policies aimed at reducing the use of animals, the number of animals used in leading U.S. laboratories increased a staggering 73 percent from 1997 ...

Concrete solutions to aging bridges

Feb 24, 2015

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), this state leads the nation in the number of bridges classified as "structurally deficient."

Recommended for you

Many transplant surgeons suffer burnout

Feb 25, 2015

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a national study on transplant surgeon burnout

5 tips for handling early-year medical expenses

Feb 25, 2015

The clock on insurance deductibles reset on Jan. 1, and that means big medical bills are in store for some. Patients may be required to pay thousands of dollars before their health care coverage kicks in.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.