British TV ban takes aim at junk food ads

Apr 02, 2007

Britain has instituted a ban on advertising unhealthy food and beverages during TV programming targeted to young children.

Ads for products high in fat, salt or sugar may not be shown during TV shows aimed at children ages 4 to 9, Sky News reported.

The ban will be expanded in 2008 to cover programming targeted at children ages 4 to 15.

The ban came in response to growing concern about childhood obesity, but health campaign activists say the new regulations are still not adequate.

A spokeswoman for the regulatory agency, OFCOM, said the new regulations will "contribute to wider efforts" to promote healthier diets among young people.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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