Report: Children's medicine has additives

Mar 11, 2007

Britain's Food Commission finds most over-the-counter medication for young children contains additives that are banned from food for infants and toddlers.

Many of the additives can cause unpleasant reactions, including asthma, The Telegraph reports.

"When a child is ill parents will reach for one of the many medicines specifically sold for young children," said Ian Tokelove, a co-author of the report. "But how many parents will read through the small print where the ingredients and possible side effects are listed?"

The Food Commission wants a ban on the additives, which include sweeteners, coloring and flavoring. But Dr. Hamish Meldrum, who heads the family practice committee of the British Medical Association, argues that children are unlikely to ingest enough to cause harm.

"In my experience, and with talking to other GPs, adverse reactions to additives in medicines is not something we come across a lot," he said. "Parents should definitely not stop giving their children these medicines without seeking medical advice."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Computer screening could help patients and healthcare

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Health concerns swirl around electronic cigarettes

Mar 26, 2014

With sales of electronic cigarettes, or "e-cigarettes," on the rise and expected to hit $1.5 billion this year, concerns over potential health risks of using the trendy devices are also gaining momentum and political clout. ...

Recommended for you

Computer screening could help patients and healthcare

29 minutes ago

A trial of a new patient care model, which uses over-the-phone consultations and computers to help better understand the needs of the patient, has begun this week, led by researchers at the University of Adelaide.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Computer screening could help patients and healthcare

A trial of a new patient care model, which uses over-the-phone consultations and computers to help better understand the needs of the patient, has begun this week, led by researchers at the University of Adelaide.

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

New alfalfa variety resists ravenous local pest

(Phys.org) —Cornell plant breeders have released a new alfalfa variety with some resistance against the alfalfa snout beetle, which has ravaged alfalfa fields in nine northern New York counties and across ...