R-rated films tied to teenage smoking

Mar 07, 2007

A U.S. study says Hollywood remains a powerful influence on teenage smoking habits.

A study by North Carolina researchers, published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, says white teens who watch lots of R-rated movies are 2.7 times as likely to start smoking as teens that do not. Teens who have television sets in their bedrooms are 2.1 percent more likely to smoke, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Virtually all R-rated films between 1988 to 1997 portrayed favorable images of smoking, the newspaper said.

The students, who were 12 to 14 years old, had never tried a cigarette when they were first interviewed. Two years later, 34 percent of the black teens and 27 percent of the white teens had started smoking, researchers from the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in Chapel Hill, N.C., said.

While African-American teens watched more R-rated movies and were more likely to have their own televisions, "their rate of smoking wasn't linked to their viewing habits," the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Penis transplant offers hope to victims of botched circumcisions

Related Stories

In the realm of eternal ice

1 hour ago

On 6 November 2010, the light of the star known as NOMAD1 0856-0015072 in the Cetus constellation dimmed. What had happened? A dwarf planet at the edge of the solar system had moved in front of the distant ...

Recommended for you

Game shows mosquito's-eye view of malaria

Apr 24, 2015

A new game about the life cycle of malaria that can be played on Android smartphones has been created by an Oxford University developer, based on malaria research at the University's Nuffield Department of ...

DMV program can generate additional organ donors

Apr 23, 2015

(HealthDay)—A brief, web-based training program for department of motor vehicles (DMV) employees that educates them about organ and tissue donation can increase the likelihood of customers registering as ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.