R-rated films tied to teenage smoking

Mar 07, 2007

A U.S. study says Hollywood remains a powerful influence on teenage smoking habits.

A study by North Carolina researchers, published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, says white teens who watch lots of R-rated movies are 2.7 times as likely to start smoking as teens that do not. Teens who have television sets in their bedrooms are 2.1 percent more likely to smoke, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Virtually all R-rated films between 1988 to 1997 portrayed favorable images of smoking, the newspaper said.

The students, who were 12 to 14 years old, had never tried a cigarette when they were first interviewed. Two years later, 34 percent of the black teens and 27 percent of the white teens had started smoking, researchers from the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in Chapel Hill, N.C., said.

While African-American teens watched more R-rated movies and were more likely to have their own televisions, "their rate of smoking wasn't linked to their viewing habits," the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Exploring 3-D printing to make organs for transplants

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microsoft unveils Xbox in China as it faces probe

2 hours ago

Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled its Xbox game console in China, the first to enter the market after an official ban 14 years ago, even as it faces a Chinese government probe over business practices.

Recommended for you

Exploring 3-D printing to make organs for transplants

8 hours ago

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients ...

High frequency of potential entrapment gaps in hospital beds

10 hours ago

A survey of beds within a large teaching hospital in Ireland has shown than many of them did not comply with dimensional standards put in place to minimise the risk of entrapment. The report, published online in the journal ...

Key element of CPR missing from guidelines

Jul 29, 2014

Removing the head tilt/chin lift component of rescue breaths from the latest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines could be a mistake, according to Queen's University professor Anthony Ho.

Burnout impacts transplant surgeons (w/ Video)

Jul 28, 2014

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a new national study on transplant surgeon ...

User comments : 0