Scientists study rise in centenarians

Jan 01, 2007

With the number of centenarians growing, scientists have been researching the secrets of living to age 100 and beyond, the Baltimore Sun says.

Recently interviewed by scientists was Lois Vaught, 104, who is the oldest resident at Friends Nursing Home in Sandy Spring, Md. Although deaf, Vaught is able to respond to questions written to her in writing and still remains very sharp. But researchers said Vaught was also genetically advantaged, having parents that lived into their 90s.

Genetics, scientists have found, play a significant role in longetivity. But behaviors are known to be a factor, too. Vaught and her late husband never drank alcohol or smoked, and always cooked healthy, even long before the trends towards organic foods.

Scientists specializing in aging said there is an increase throughout the world in people living to 100 and beyond. Much of this is attributed to vaccination programs and better water and sewage systems.

The Sun reported that several studies are under way by epidemiologists and other experts, some of whom predict that humans will eventually live to 125 on average.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Morocco confronts abortion taboo with proposed reform

Related Stories

DARPA seeks new positioning, navigation, timing solutions

5 hours ago

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), writing about GPS, said: "The military relies heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), but GPS access is easily blocked by methods such as jamming. In addition, many environments in which our mil ...

Lights out in Australia as Earth Hour kicks off

5 hours ago

The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the sails on the nearby Opera House went dark Saturday, as lights on landmarks around Australia were switched off for the global climate change awareness campaign Earth Hour.

Future US Navy: Robotic sub-hunters, deepsea pods

9 hours ago

The robotic revolution that transformed warfare in the skies will soon extend to the deep sea, with underwater spy "satellites," drone-launching pods on the ocean floor and unmanned ships hunting submarines.

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.