Study finds certain drugs cut Alzheimer's

Dec 06, 2006

U.S. scientists say they've identified anti-hypertensive agents that can prevent cognitive decline and amyloid neuropathology in Alzheimer patients.

The research, conducted by Dr. Giulio Maria Pasinetti and colleagues at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, suggests a large number of geriatric patients under pharmacological treatment for high-blood pressure with certain anti-hypertensive drugs might also reap the benefits of the drug's cognitive effects.

Pasinetti's research is part of a growing push to identify and develop more effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

"There is no convincing evidence that there is any available drug presently on the market to cure Alzheimer's disease and there are many questions surrounding the effectiveness of drugs that are available to delay or effectively alleviate symptoms of memory deterioration or dementia," said Pasinetti.

During the past two years, researchers have begun screening drugs already commercially available for treatment of other disorders to determine their potential value in treating Alzheimer's disease and cognitive impairment.

Pasinetti's findings were presented Wednesday in New York during the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology's annual conference.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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