Global maps created to show malaria hotspots

Dec 04, 2006
Global maps created to show malaria hotspots
Map of where malaria has been sampled in populations between 1985 and 2006, from the website. (See www.map.ox.ac.uk)

Global maps are being created that will define, for the first time in over 40 years, the distribution of malaria risk worldwide. The atlas will help those involved in malaria control.

The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP), a collaboration between the Kenya Medical Research Institute and the University of Oxford, has been funded by the Wellcome Trust to produce the maps. Its goals are described in PLoS Medicine this month.

Dr Simon Hay in Oxford’s Zoology Department, a member of the MAP team, said: ‘The aim of the project is not just to assemble data but to link these information to environmental and population data and make continuous global maps of malaria risk to help rationalise control.’

Across the world malaria scientists collect information on how many people are infected with malaria parasites. Never before have all the data been gathered into a single source and linked to a map of the world. MAP has so far assembled information from 3126 communities in 79 countries, and represents the single largest repository of contemporary information on malaria risk to date.

MAP intends to give open access to its data, so that it can help anyone and everyone involved in malaria control. A member of the team has developed an interface between the MAP data and Google Earth.

‘How we design malaria control and measure its impact depends on knowing how much malaria exists in a given area,’ says Professor Bob Snow from the Centre for Tropical Medicine at Oxford and based at the Centre for Geographic Medicine in Nairobi. ‘Like any war, knowing where your enemy is located and in what strength determines how you engage them.’

For more information see www.map.ox.ac.uk .

Source: University of Oxford

Explore further: Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Still a lot to learn about India's deadly air pollution

Aug 12, 2014

What exactly is the relationship between exposure to air pollution and its effect on human health? How much cleaner would the air have to be to reduce the health burden of dirty air? Can cities be designed ...

Predicting climate-change-related disease in Africa

Nov 22, 2013

It is common knowledge that climate change particularly affects developing countries, but its effects on health are still very hard to predict. In a joint effort to bridge this gap, the QWECI project set ...

How anti-poverty programs go viral

Jul 26, 2013

Anti-poverty researchers and policymakers often wrestle with a basic problem: How can they get people to participate in beneficial programs? Now a new empirical study co-authored by two MIT development economists ...

Recommended for you

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

11 hours ago

Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

17 hours ago

Cerebral palsy is a neurological developmental disorder which follows an injury to the immature brain before, during or after birth. The resulting condition affects the child's ability to move and in some ...

19 new dengue cases in Japan, linked to Tokyo park

23 hours ago

Japan is urging local authorities to be on the lookout for further outbreaks of dengue fever, after confirming another 19 cases that were contracted at a popular local park in downtown Tokyo.

User comments : 0