Hot flash study examines diabetes

Oct 09, 2006

A University of Texas researcher has received funding to study if menopausal hot flashes can be controlled similar to sugar levels -- by diet and exercise.

First, nursing assistant professor Sharon Dormire must determine whether a sudden drop in blood sugar levels causes hot flashes, which includes symptoms of sweating, interrupted sleep, memory problems and anxiety, the Austin (Texas) American-Statesman said. She said falling blood glucose can cause similar symptoms in diabetics.

If Dormire's theory proves true, women suffering hot flashes could avoid drug therapy and possibly treated by exercise and eating six small meals a day to even out their sugar levels.

Hot flashes affect eight in 10 menopausal women and usually are treated with hormonal therapy.

Dormire received a $218,000 grant for her research, the American-Statesman said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researcher develops, proves effectiveness of new drug for spinal muscular atrophy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New camera sheds light on mate choice of swordtail fish

9 minutes ago

We have all seen a peacock show its extravagant, colorful tail feathers in courtship of a peahen. Now, a group of researchers have used a special camera developed by an engineer at Washington University in ...

Making quantum dots glow brighter

59 minutes ago

Researchers from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and the University of Oklahoma have found a new way to control the properties of quantum dots, those tiny chunks of semiconductor material that glow ...

Recommended for you

Cellular protein may be key to longevity

23 hours ago

Researchers have found that levels of a regulatory protein called ATF4, and the corresponding levels of the molecules whose expression it controls, are elevated in the livers of mice exposed to multiple interventions ...

Gut bacteria tire out T cells

Sep 15, 2014

Leaky intestines may cripple bacteria-fighting immune cells in patients with a rare hereditary disease, according to a study by researchers in Lausanne, Switzerland. The study, published in The Journal of Experimental Me ...

T-bet tackles hepatitis

Sep 15, 2014

A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to a report appearing in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

User comments : 0