NIH starts clinical research consortium

Oct 03, 2006

The U.S. National Institutes of Health is forming a consortium to transform how the nation's clinical and translational research is conducted.

The consortium begins with 12 academic health centers located across the nation. An additional 52 centers will receive planning grants to help them prepare applications to join the group.

When fully implemented in 2012, about 60 institutions will be linked to energize the discipline of clinical and translational science.

"The development of this consortium represents the first systematic change in our approach to clinical research in 50 years," said NIH Director Elias Zerhouni. "Working together, these sites will serve as discovery engines that will improve medical care by applying new scientific advances to real world practice.

The first set of five-year grants will be awarded: Columbia University Health Sciences, Duke University, the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, the Oregon Health & Science University, Rockefeller University, Yale University, the Texas Health Science Center, and the universities of California-Davis, California-San Francisco, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh and Rochester.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Experts: Chopin's heart shows signs of TB

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics

Sep 08, 2014

Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey - as we now know it - was manufactured and sold in stores. So what is the key to its' antimicrobial properties? Researchers at Lund University ...

Intricate algae produce low-cost biosensors

Sep 01, 2014

(Phys.org) —Oregon State University researchers are combining diatoms, a type of single-celled photosynthetic algae, with nanoparticles to create a sensor capable of detecting miniscule amounts of protein or other biomarkers.

Recommended for you

The argument in favor of doping

5 hours ago

Ahead of Friday's court ruling on whether ASADA's investigation into the Essendon Football Club was lawful, world leader in practical and medical ethics Professor Julian Savulescu, looks at whether there is a role for performance-enhancing ...

Errata frequently seen in medical literature

Sep 16, 2014

(HealthDay)—Errata, including those that may materially change the interpretation of data, are frequent in medical publications, according to a study published in the August issue of The American Journal of ...

User comments : 0