Childhood asthma reduces chance of smoking in teen boys

Oct 08, 2010 By David Pittman

A boy who has asthma is less likely to smoke as a teenager, according to a new study from Italy.

Giuseppe Verlato, an epidemiologist at the University of Verona, asked participants to recall whether they smoked between the ages of 11 and 20 and if they had suffered from as young children.

They found that 49 percent of men who smoked as teens did not have asthma in their childhood. This compared to 35.6 percent of men who smoked as teens and had asthma as children.

This “shielding” effect did not apply to girls. For women, 39.4 percent without childhood asthma began before age 20 compared with 41.2 percent of those with asthma.

The study appears online in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Asthma, a disease that inflames and narrows the breathing airways, occurs in 8 percent to 9 percent of children, said John Carl, head of the pediatric pulmonology department at Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital.

“Smoking as an asthmatic is kind of like trying to put out a fire with gasoline,” he said. “You’re adding a lot of inflammation to the type of inflammation that’s already there.”

The study notes that adolescents with asthma are more prone to psychological problems because of negative social perceptions resulting from their disease. “For girls with asthma, smoking could be a way to increase self-esteem, which has been shown to be lower in girls than boys,” the authors wrote.

Carl said other factors affect whether a person starts smoking or not including socio-economic status, race and parents’ smoking habits.

Explore further: Web-based training can reduce campus rape

More information: Verlato G, et al. Asthma in childhood reduces smoking initiation in subsequent teenage among males. J Adol Health online 2010.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Aussie study links asthma to smoking

Sep 04, 2006

Australian scientists who spent nearly 40 years on a research program say asthma in adults can be the result of maternal smoking.

Telehealth keeps asthmatics out of hospitals

Oct 06, 2010

Health care delivered via telephone or Internet might not improve the quality of life for people with mild asthma, but it could keep those with severe asthma out of the hospital, a new evidence review finds.

Recommended for you

Dirty water raising health risk in flooded Kashmir

1 hour ago

The floodwaters are finally receding in much of Kashmir, but health experts worry a crisis could be looming with countless bloated livestock floating across the waterlogged region and hundreds of thousands ...

Smoking rates on the rise in New York City

12 hours ago

For the first time in years, more than 1 million New Yorkers are smoking, marking a disturbing rise of tobacco use in the city that pioneered a number of anti-smoking initiatives that were emulated nationally.

User comments : 0