DNA repair capacity identified those at high risk for non-melanoma skin cancer

Oct 02, 2010

DNA repair capacity (DRC) measurements effectively identified individuals who were at high risk for non-melanoma skin cancer, and may be a useful method to evaluate the efficacy of preventive therapies, according to study results presented at the Third AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities.

"Our study showed that persons with low DRC have three times greater likelihood of having non-melanoma skin cancer as compared to those with high DRC," said Manuel Bayona, M.D., Ph.D., professor of the Public Health Program at the Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto Rico.

DRC is a complex involving more than 200 proteins that is used to repair damage to DNA within cells. Bayona explained that can be caused by exposure to solar ultraviolet light and other types of radiation, dietary factors and aging. DRC has been linked to several types of .

The researchers conducted a case-controlled study among participants in Puerto Rico to determine whether a reduced DRC was a risk factor for non-melanoma skin cancer.

After comparing DRC levels in 477 newly-diagnosed, non-melanoma skin cancer cases and 365 controls without cancer, they found that low DRC levels were strongly associated with non-melanoma skin cancer.

Bayona and colleagues also studied key risk factors and their possible association with DRC as predictors for non-melanoma skin cancer:

  • demographics (age, gender) and family history of non-melanoma skin cancer;
  • skin, hair and eye color, and presence of freckles;
  • occupational and recreational sun exposure;
  • sunscreen use;
  • cigarette smoking;
  • vitamins, aspirin and ;
  • DRC levels; and,
  • dermatological information and other variables that could provide an estimate of non-melanoma skin cancer risk.
These findings in Puerto Rico are consistent with previous studies conducted elsewhere, according to the researchers. Additionally, participants who did not use sunblock, did not take aspirin and/or did not take multivitamin supplements regularly had increased odds of non-melanoma skin cancer.

"Doctors could use DRC levels to monitor how non-melanoma risk decreases in individuals taking cancer preventive therapies," he said.

Explore further: Marine Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake is associated with lower risk of MSI-high CRC

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Solariums double skin cancer risk in young people

Aug 03, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists have confirmed what has long been feared - young people who use solariums have almost double the risk of being diagnosed with skin cancer before the age of 40.

New study definitively links indoor tanning to melanoma

May 27, 2010

New research from the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center definitively links the use of indoor tanning devices to increased risk of melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer.

Recommended for you

Experts set strategic priorities for lymphoma research

9 hours ago

A committee of lymphoma experts today unveiled a strategic roadmap identifying key priority areas in both infrastructure and research that will be critical for advancing treatments for people with lymphoma. The report is meant to inform future research directions as well as fund ...

Research aims to reduce health care disparities

9 hours ago

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical community. Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center found that the LGBTQI community ...

Promising drug target identified in medulloblastoma

10 hours ago

Scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center have identified a protein critical to both the normal development of the brain and, in many cases, the development of medulloblastoma, a fast-growing ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.