Bisphenol-A chemical used in baby bottles safe: EU agency

Sep 30, 2010

Bisphenol-A, a chemical used in baby bottles that is banned in Australia, Denmark, Canada and France, poses no health risks, the European Food Safety Authority said Friday.

The agency has already given favourable opinions on the chemical twice, but the requested a new scientific analysis in the wake of 800 new studies with sometimes contradictory conclusions.

A panel of EFSA scientists concluded that "they could not identify any new evidence which would lead them to revise" the tolerable daily intake of that the agency has set, 0.05 milligrammes per kilogramme of body weight.

"Should any new relevant data become available in the future, the panel will reconsider this opinion," the agency said in a statement.

One panel member expressed a minority opinion saying some recent studies point to uncertainties regarding adverse health effects below the tolerable daily intake.

The expert recommended that the current daily intake recommendation should be temporary.

BPA is used in the production of polycarbonated plastics and epoxy resins found in , plastic containers, the lining of cans used for and beverages, and in dental sealants.

France has banned baby bottles containing the chemical due to suspicions that it harms human development.

Denmark has gone a step further by extending the prohibition to all containing BPA for children up to three years old.

Bans are also in place in Australia, Canada and a few US states.

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User comments : 2

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sams
not rated yet Sep 30, 2010
BPA is not banned in Australia.
ereneon
not rated yet Sep 30, 2010
Maybe they meant Austria?
"Where are you from?"
"I'm from Austria"
"Well then let's throw some shrimp on the barbie mate!"
dumb and dumber movie reference

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