Major breakthrough will revolutionize the screening and treatment of genetic diseases

Jun 10, 2010

A research team led by Dr. Nada Jabado at the MUHC and Dr. Jacek Majewski at McGill University has proven for the first time that it is possible to identify any genetic disease in record time thanks to a powerful and reliable exome sequencing method. The exome, a small part of the genome (< 2%), is of crucial interest with regard to research on genetic diseases as it accounts for 85% of mutations. the results of the team's research have just been published in the journal Human Mutation.

"With this new approach, we no longer need to access patients who share the same altered gene pools to be able to identify the gene responsible for a disease. All we require are two persons affected by the disease not necessarily from the same family," explains Dr. Jabado, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at MUHC's Montreal Children's Hospital. "Now, within two weeks and with just two patients, we can easily isolate a gene. This compares to a time frame of six or seven months or even years before we saw results with the old process. This is really a positive breakthrough in ."

In their study, the researchers focused on isolating the mutation responsible for a rare and deadly genetic syndrome, Fowler's Syndrome, which is involved in the anarchic proliferation of brain vessels that hinder the brain's development. Their results have revealed - between two patients with no family ties - a rare case of four mutations in the same gene. This illustrates well the effectiveness of this sequencing technique, the goal of which is to isolate in cases of hereditary diseases among children, regardless of how prevalent they are in society (e.g. mucoviscidosis, sickle-cell anemia).

"These results are very promising. There is now hope that in the near future we can treat a patient presenting a rare, unknown genetic disease in our laboratory, and within a few days be able to sequence his or her DNA to find the mutation that caused the disease," states Dr. Jacek Majewski, Assistant Professor at McGill University's Department of .

Thanks to this new, rapid and effective genome sequencing process, within one or two years a 'full catalogue' of mutations that are responsible for most hereditary diseases are expected to be revealed, in addition to further advances in many other more complex diseases, such as cancer in children.

"The sequencing of will lead to a change in our medical practices," Dr. Jabado informs us. "Each patient could receive a personalized treatment depending on the particular genes involved. By sequencing the patient's genome, we will be better able to target the disease and adapt treatment to achieve the best results, according to tolerance levels for each person."

Explore further: You may have billions and billions of good reasons for being unfit

More information: Scientific article : www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123473462/abstract

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antialias
3 / 5 (2) Jun 10, 2010
With just two patients you will get a lot of false positives. Increase the number of patients a bit and you've got something there.
gwrede
5 / 5 (1) Jun 10, 2010
Thanks to this new, rapid and effective genome sequencing process, within one or two years a 'full catalogue' of mutations that are responsible for most hereditary diseases are expected to be revealed
If this is true, these guys definitely will get the Nobel Prize, within 2 years. And they should!
Djincs
not rated yet Jun 13, 2010
Great idea, a better use of this tehnology will be when a couple decide to have a child they can see wheter there is some risk for their child to inherit some disease or just bad DNA, then with a little help from in vitro tehnology we can cleen up our DNA just for several generations!
And then no treatment for these deseases will be needed.

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