Study: Emergency department computer keyboards and bacteria

Jun 03, 2010

Keyboards located in triage and registration areas were found to be more contaminated with bacteria than those in other areas of the Emergency Department at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, according to a new study conducted by the hospital.

"Contamination was predominantly found in non-treatment areas," says Angela Pugliese, M.D., lead author of the study and an emergency department physician at Henry Ford Hospital.

"This suggests that only areas without true patient contact, and likely less frequent , might benefit from using washable silicone rubber or antibacterial keyboards instead of a standard ."

Dr. Pugliese will present the findings June 5 at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine in Phoenix.

Multiple studies have found colonies of bacteria on computer keyboards. Due to the threat of its potential spread to patients, Henry Ford's Information Technology and departments recommended exchanging traditional keyboards in the for washable, silicone rubber models.

The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and type of keyboard contamination before replacing the keyboards.

Seventy-two standard, non-silicone rubber keyboards were swabbed on two different days, six days apart. All keyboard keys, except the function keys, were cultured and analyzed for bacteria.

Less than 14 percent, or 10 keyboards, were colonized with nine different . Of the keyboards in non-treatment areas, nearly 32 percent were contaminated, versus less than nine percent in treatment areas.

Further studies are needed to determine if measures such as more frequent cleaning, or replacing standard keyboards with silicone rubber or antibacterial keyboards, would improve safety in these non-clinical areas, said Dr. Pugliese.

Explore further: Clinical trial finds virtual ward does not reduce hospital readmissions

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Eleksen develops keyboards for Microsoft

Mar 10, 2006

Eleksen Ltd. said Friday it was developing a line of its "smart fabric" touch pads for use in Microsoft's just-unveiled ultra-mobile personal computers.

Who moved my 'Delete' key? Lenovo did. Here's why.

Jun 25, 2009

Lenovo put nearly a year of research into two design changes that debuted on an updated ThinkPad laptop this week. No, not the thinner, lighter form or the textured touchpad - rather, the extra-large "Delete" ...

Recommended for you

Rehospitalization in younger patients

2 hours ago

Older adults often are readmitted after hospitalization for heart failure, pneumonia, and acute myocardial infarction, a significant issue that has caused Medicare to target hospitals with high 30-day readmission rates for ...

User comments : 0