A useful tool to detect in vivo angiogenesis in IBD patients: Narrow-band imaging

May 20, 2010

A research team from Italy investigated whether narrow-band imaging (NBI) is a useful tool for the in vivo detection of angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Their results showed NBI may be a novel modality for imaging of intestinal angiogenesis in IBD.

Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in neoplastic and non-neoplastic chronic inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Several reports have shown that blockade of angiogenesis in preclinical models of IBD is a promising new therapeutic approach. Visualize angiogenesis in vivo may represent the first step for such a therapeutic approach. Narrow-band imaging (NBI) is a new endoscopic technology that highlights mucosal surface structures and microcapillaries.

Performing the conventional and NBI in 14 patients with colonic inflammation (8 ulcerative colitis and 6 Crohn's disease), a research team from Italy analyzed the use of NBI for the in vivo detection of angiogenesis in IBD patients. Their study will be published on May 21, 2010 in the .

They found that NBI could be used to visualize areas of abnormal microvascular changes, not observed with white light colonoscopy. Blockade of angiogenesis could be beneficial in patients with and some drugs that have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of IBD, such tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, have potent antiangiogenic activity. The findings suggest that NBI could be a novel tool for the in vivo assessment of mucosal angiogenesis. However, larger studies are needed to define the exact role of NBI in IBD patient follow-up.

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More information: Danese S, Fiorino G, Angelucci E, Vetrano S, Pagano N, Rando G, Spinelli A, Malesci A, Repici A. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy to assess mucosal angiogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16(19): 2396-2400. www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v16/i19/2396.htm

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