Quality of life reduced in hospitalized vertebral fracture patients

May 07, 2010

Vertebral fractures are the most common of all osteoporotic fractures and can have a devastating impact on a person's quality of life.

Research presented today at the World Congress on 2010 (IOF WCO-ECCEO10) from the ongoing ICUROS study gave an indication of the early results of quality of life effects in relation to vertebral fractures.

Interestingly, patients who were hospitalised as a result of their vertebral fractures had a significantly larger quality of life reduction, than non-hospitalised patients.

The study included data from patients from four European countries and the results support the previously observed large decrease in quality of life that occurs as a result of , from other studies.

The reasons for this need further exploration, however according to Dr Fredrik Borgstrom, "the existence of co-morbidities among the hospitalised fracture group and higher severity of fractures are likely reasons."

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