Doctors use ultrasound to diagnose possible muscular trauma in professional athletes on-site

May 06, 2010

Doctors can use ultrasonography (ultrasound) to evaluate and diagnose muscular trauma in professional athletes on-site, which helps them to determine whether or not a player's injuries are severe enough to take them out of the game, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2010 Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

"Muscular is very common in athletes, especially soccer players," said Ashok Kumar Nath, MD, lead author of the study. "Ultrasound is a readily available, free imaging modality that allows us to diagnose muscle tears on-site," said Nath.

The study, performed in Muscat, Oman, included 50 male soccer players with possible muscular trauma in the thigh and calf region. was performed on-site during a soccer game. "Forty-six players were found to have either a complete or partial muscle tear. As a result their play was discontinued," said Nath.

"If we diagnose a muscle tear on-site, we know whether or not a player should continue playing or not. If a partial tear goes undiagnosed and a player continues to play, the continued stress of the game could result in a complete muscle tear, which is much more difficult to treat," he said.

Explore further: Experts call for higher exam pass marks to close performance gap between international and UK medical graduates

Provided by American College of Radiology

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